James Stewart: The Solution Or The Problem?

By Keith Rivas (@bkrivas95)  Comments
Updated: April 6, 2015
Courtesy Supercross.com

Courtesy Supercross.com

This past December, the FIM — an organization that oversees James Stewart and his competition — handed out a hefty suspension for the all-star racer after a failed drug test. As you can imagine, this had a similar effect to golf’s loss of Tiger Woods, basketball’s previous issues with Kobe Bryant, and even NASCAR with Tony Stewart and Kurt Busch in their respective situations.

And some of them didn’t end pretty.

As a result of a urine sample that tested positive for an amphetamine following a test conducted in Seattle, Washington last April, FIM felt the need to really send a message to James Stewart, his fellow racers, and their large national and international audience about the consequences of breaking the rules.

And honestly, they came through in a huge way.

Consequently, Stewart was stripped not only of 2015 competition (at least until August 11, 2015), but also of any competitive achievements he got in races following the Seattle scenario. While he could make a re-appearance in mid-August, that would come after ten rounds have already passed with his particular competition.

That puts him way too far — even for someone like Stewart — behind the field for a comeback of a positive note.

Over the last couple of years, Stewart has blown away the competition and proven that he is to Lucas Oil Motocross what Sebastian Vettel and Fernando Alonso are to Formula 1. Stewart not only has dominated in the majority of the races he’s entered, but he’s broken a color barrier not many saw being broken for quite some team.

Being the first African-American Motocross racer, he’s had a lot of pressure on him, no question, but that’s never an excuse for cheating — and in cases like this, whether or not he broke the rules is no mere matter of opinion.

He’s more than just famous or a face — he’s a freak show.

As Stewart eyes a 2016 return to the racing he loves, fans of Stewart — and even critics — await the changed man we all hope to see in the coming races.

No one like’s a cheater. Let’s hope as a result of this that less and less people like to be one.

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